Wednesday, 28 June 2017

LATTICED SPIDER SHAWL – 1


free crochet shawl pattern

LATTICED SPIDER SHAWL – 1

I have made a similar latticed spider shawl before but that one only had the spider pattern along the edges… so if you just multiply the pattern over, you get this lovely creation.


This is not my original pattern.  I have worked off the chart that I used for my earlier project, and instead of the lacy centre portion, I just worked the latticed spider stitch all through the project.  So here are my notes as I make my own project.

Materials used : I have used about 120 gms of our lovely Indian Oswal Cashmilon 3-ply, light fingering yarn with a 3.5 mm crochet hook
You could also use our Indian Anchor / Red rose / White or the wide range of Alize knitting cotton yarns with a 3 - 3.5 mm crochet hook too.

Size : ~ 36” x 68”

Stitches used :  (Using U.S terminology)

Magic circle : To refresh your skill, please view this easy video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLuSVyKvoUg

Chainless dc start : Instead of the usual start with ch 2 or ch 3,I’d like to introduce a lovely way of starting a double crochet row.  Do take a look at this self explanatory super video
In case you are unhappy with this start, or do not like it, do continue with the usual ch-2 or ch-3 start.  However, all instructions will be given assuming that you are using this chainless dc start.



free crochet shawl pattern







We start our lovely shawl from the centre of the triangle, that will be furthest to you.  We can start with 3 ch and work 2 dc in the 3rd ch from hk, but I much prefer the magic circle start.  So choose your start, hooks on.. let’s start.

Start with a magic circle and 3 dc in that circle. 
Pull lightly to close.  Turn.

Row 1 : 3 dc in the 1st dc ; ch 3, sk next dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

Row 2 : 3 dc in the 1st dc ; ch 3, sk next 2 dc, dc in the next ch-3 sp ;
ch 3, sk next 2 dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

Row 3 : 3 dc in the 1st dc ; ch 3, sk next 2 dc ; dc in the next ch-3 sp ;
ch 3, sk next 2 dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

Row 4 : 3 dc in the 1st dc ;
ch 5, sk next 2 dc , (sc in the next ch-3 sp ; sc in next dc ; sc in the next ch-3 sp) ;
ch 5, sk next 2 dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

Row 5 : 3 dc in the 1st dc ;
ch 7, sk next 2 dc ; (sc in the next ch-5 sp ; sc in next 3 sc ; sc in the next ch-5 sp) ; ch 7, sk next 2 dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

Row 6 : dc in the 1st dc ; ch 3, sk next dc ; dc in the next dc ;
2 dc in the next ch-7 sp ; (ch 5, sk 1st sc, sc in next 3 sc) ;
ch 5, sk next sc, 2 dc in the next ch-7 sp ; dc in the next dc ;
ch 3, sk next dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

And just as we’re finishing our first spider stitch, we’re starting off on the next one.

Row 7 : 3 dc in the 1st dc ; (ch 3, sk next 2 dc ; dc in the next ch-3 sp) ;
ch 3, sk next 2 dc, dc in the next dc ; 2 dc in the next ch-5 sp ;
ch 5, sk next sc, dc in the next sc ;
ch 5, sk next sc, 2 dc in the next ch-5 sp, dc in the next dc ;
rep (to) once ; ch 3, sk next 2 dc and 3 dc in the last dc. Turn.

The next row is a rep of Row 4, in a way.

Row 8 : 3 dc in the 1st dc ;
(ch 5, sk next 2 dc , sc in the next ch-3 sp ; sc in next dc ; sc in the next ch-3 sp) ;
ch 5, sk next 2 dc, dc in the next dc ; 2 dc in the next ch-5 sp ;
ch 1, sk next dc , 2 dc in the next ch-5 sp ; dc in the next dc ;
rep (to) once ; ch 5, sk next 2 dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn. 

The next row is a rep of Row 5, in a way.

Row 9 : 3 dc in the 1st dc ;
(ch 7, sk next 2 dc , sc in the next ch-5 sp ; sc in next 3 sc ; sc in the next ch-5 sp) ; ch 7, sk next 2 dc, dc in the next dc ; dc in the next ch-1 sp ; dc in the next dc ;
rep (to) once ; ch 7, sk next 2 dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

The next row is a rep of Row 6, in a way.

Row 10 : 3 dc in the 1st dc ;
(ch 3, sk next dc ; dc in the next dc ; 2 dc in the next ch-7 sp ;
ch 5, sk 1st sc, sc in next 3 sc ; ch 5, sk next sc, 2 dc in the next ch-7 sp ;
dc in the next dc) ;
rep (to) once ; ch 3, sk next dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

The next row is a rep of Row 7, in a way.

Row 11 : 3 dc in the 1st dc ;
(ch 3, sk next 2 dc ; dc in the next ch-3 sp ;
ch 3, sk next 2 dc, dc in the next dc ; 2 dc in the next ch-5 sp ;
ch 5, sk next sc, dc in the next sc ;
ch 5, sk next sc, 2 dc in the next ch-5 sp, dc in the next dc) ;
rep (to) once ; ch 3, sk next 2 dc and 3 dc in the last dc. Turn.

The next row is a rep of Row 8, in a way.

Row 12 : 3 dc in the 1st dc ;
(ch 5, sk next 2 dc , sc in the next ch-3 sp ; sc in next dc ; sc in the next ch-3 sp ;
ch 5, sk next 2 dc, dc in the next dc ; 2 dc in the next ch-5 sp ;
ch 1, sk next dc , 2 dc in the next ch-5 sp ; dc in the next dc) ;
rep (to) 2 times ;
ch 5, sk next 2 dc, sc in the next ch-3 sp ; sc in next dc ; sc in the next ch-3 sp ;
ch 5, sk next 2 dc , 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn. 

The next row is a rep of Row 9, in a way.

Row 13 : 3 dc in the 1st dc ;
(ch 7, sk next 2 dc , sc in the next ch-5 sp ; sc in next 3 sc ; sc in the next ch-5 sp ;
ch 7, sk next 2 dc, dc in the next dc ; dc in the next ch-1 sp ; dc in the next dc) ;
rep (to) once ; ch 7, sk next 2 dc, 3 dc in the last dc.  Turn.

Put your work down and see the three little diamonds of spider stitch we’ve created thus far. You would probably have figured out repeats as well.

Our pattern repeat will be Rows 10 – 13, ending in a Row 13. 
Continue this till you get the shawl till the length you want. 

free crochet shawl pattern

Finishing :
A lovely shawl always needs a lovely finish.

So options : You could do a row or two of sc on the edges.

OR, though both the chart and finished shawl do not show it, you could work a lovely picot edging and here’s a quick refresher on how to do that.

One could also add beads for a little bling to this already beautiful creation. 

And here’s a quick link on how to add beads in your project https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8MbLCuyfv-M

And just in case you are trying to work out how to thread your beads onto your yarn, then here’s a lovely video link

OR you can work this little edging that I have worked.


 For our edging, our stitch count is in multiples 8. 


free crochet shawl pattern

free crochet shawl pattern


I have decided to work this edging on all three sides of the triangle, so we will work in a circle. 
IF you decide not to work on the flat side that goes against the neck, your stitch count will be in multiples of 8 + 1

Start with a row of sc all around ensuring that you get the same number of stitches on the two sides of the triangle and get a multiple of 8 all around.  The easiest way to get all this done is to ensure you have multiples of 8 on all three sides.

The border is made up of a total of 3 rounds, so working back, you can now calculate how many inches this will add to your work.  If you decide you want a larger border, then you will need to work a few more rounds of sc all around, one on top of the other…. OR you can work hdc or dc (which will add to the width of the border, obviously).  Whatever you do, ensure you keep the stitch count.  You should also work 3 stitches per corner (in the apex of each corner) each extra round that you work, so that your work will open out and the edges will not curl.

I am going to write the pattern as charted, but I am going to give you ideas that you can work on before you start the charted pattern – use it as you wish.

So if you want a little more width than just a longer stitch (as in hdc / dc as against sc), then you can work a row of ‘holes’ / spaces.  For this, you would work a st in the 1st st, sk the next st and work a st in the next st.  You will work this way all around till the apex (three corners), where you will work a (st ; ch 1, st ; ch 1, st) all in the same apex / corner centre st.  I only say “stitch” as you are free to use sc / hdc / dc depending on how much you wish to add for your border.

IF you work a hole / space row, you will need to work an all-stitch row thereafter, before you start on the border pattern.  So for the all-stitch row, you will work 1 st per st and 1 st in each ch-1 sp.  Remember that in the centre stitch for each apex / corner, you will work the required 3 sts as usual, so that it will keep each corner open flat.

Please remember that at the end of all these extra lines you will still need the stitch count in multiples of 8.

Right then, once you have done all the extensions you wish, we will start on the border 2 rounds.

In the following row, we’re working a trc 2-tog.  Here’s a quick look at how to get this done, if you need it.

How to crochet the treble / triple 2-together (trc 2-tog) : If you’ve worked a dc 2-tog, then this is a lot like that, just that you work it with a trc.
*yo two times, insert hk into st ; yo and pull up a lp ; [yo, draw through 2 lps] ; rep [to] once ; rep *to* once more ; yo and draw through all 3 lps on hk.  One trc 2-tog complete.

We will work a set of four trc 2-tog separated by 2 chs per set, and in each corner we will work 2 sets, separated by 2 chs.

Now I am assuming that we are in the corner apex centre st, and will give instructions from there.

Round 1 : trc 2-tog in the 1st st ; (ch 2, trc 2-tog) in the same st ; 
rep (to) 5 times in the same st ;
*{ch 2, sk next 3 sts, sc in the next st ; 
ch 2, sk next 3 sts, trc 2-tog in the next st ; rep (to) 3 times in the same st} ; 
rep {to} till the next corner centre st and rep (to) 7 times all in the same st* ; 
rep *to* all the way around till the 1st st ; ch 2, and join with a sl-st to the 1st st.
Note : Remember that in each corner centre st, you will work one set seven trc 4-tog.

In the following round, we will be skipping all the trc 2-tog and working only in the ch-2 sps.
Round 2 : sl-st past the 1st trc 2-tog and into the 1st ch-2 sp, sc in the same ch-2 sp ; 
*(ch 4, sc in the same ch-2 sp ; ch 4, sk next trc 4-tog, sc in the next ch-2 sp) ; 
rep (to) 2 times ; [ch 4, sk next trc 4-tog, sc in the next ch-2 sp ; 
ch 4, sk next sc, sc in the next ch-2 sp* ; 
rep *to* all around till end ; ch 4 and join with a sl-st to the 1st st.
Fasten off and weave in ends.

Finally with all scarves and shawls, I will always suggest that you block your project before use or handing over to your client.
Block as per yarn requirements.. and then do show your lovely work off.  Please do tag me on Facebook when you finish your product, as I’d love to see your creation(s).

How to block a shawl : Check out this video for a "how to"

Enjoyed this ?? I sure did.. come back right here for more freebie patterns J

If you're visiting me here for the first time, and have liked the experience, do add me to your mailing list (for your convenience) , and all my future free patterns will come straight to your mail box.  


Have a great day and see you soon. J

I have a more neckwear that you may like to take a look at




















































Monday, 26 June 2017

LATTICED CROCHET TOP

free crochet ladies top pattern

LATTICED CROCHET TOP


This is a pretty simple pattern and it works up pretty quickly.  I found this chart and thought that it was a really nice pattern for someone who was just starting out with crochet to work on. 

Just for your information, I have done this same stitch before as a jacket / bolero pattern too and you can get that free pattern at https://shyamanivas.blogspot.in/2015/04/full-sleeved-lattice-bolero.html - so you can make a matching set .. of sorts. 

Come along then on our journey as we discover this new pattern together. J

Do check my long Pinterest link for all the free patterns I’ve written up over the years right at the bottom of this blog.

And inspired by this photo / chart, here are my pattern notes as I work on my project.

Materials usedToday I’ve used ~ 150 gms of our lovely Indian Red Rose knitting cotton yarn with a 3.0 mm crochet hook

To purchase this or similar yarns, do click on the top right hand side of this blog 
(read : Click here to buy yarns Online)

For Non-IndiansI have used a regular knitting cotton that technically uses a 2 – 2.5 mm crochet hook (recommended).  I use a larger hook as I like the extra stretch it affords the end product.  Among the international yarns I have used in this thickness, I’d suggest Aunt Lydia Cotton 10, Aunt Lydia Bamboo-Viscose 10, DMC Petra, Sullivans knitting cotton (Australia), Milford Soft, Hilaza Rustica Eclat , Alize cotton yarn and Alize bamboo yarn.

Size : I have made this for a size S-M (34")

Difficulty level : Intermediate Skill level. 

Stitches used :
fsc : Foundation Single Crochet : To refresh your skill on the fsc, please view this superb video by Tamara Kelly at the link  http://www.mooglyblog.com/foundation-single-crochet-fdc/

fdc : Foundation Double Crochet : This is a unique way of starting a project directly with a row of double crochet stitches.  This makes your whole project neat and even.. in a way that you need to do once, to agree!  If you are familiar with fsc, you’ll wonder why you never used this start before !

Chainless dc start : Instead of the usual dc row start with ch 2 or ch 3, I’d like to introduce this lovely new way of starting a dc row. Do take a look at this self explanatory video at http://www.mooglyblog.com/chainless-starting-double-crochet/ In case you are unhappy with this start, do continue with the usual ch 2 or ch 3 start.  However, all instructions are given assuming that you’re using this chainless dc start. 

fpdc : Front Post Double Crochet : Post stitches are stitches worked around the post of a stitch of the row below. 
How to work the fpdc :  yo, hk into sp between posts of st from row below – going from back of stitch, around st and into the front of the st ; yo, pull yarn through the sps (3 lps on hk), (yo & pull through 2 lps) twice.  One fpdc complete 


bpdc : Back Post Double Crochet :  http://newstitchaday.com/back-post-double-crochet-stitch/
yo, hk into sp between posts of st from row below – going from front of stitch, around st and into the back of the st ; yo, pull yarn through the sps (3 lps on hk), (yo & pull through 2 lps) twice.  One bpdc complete



How to join with single crochet : Check the links below :

How to join with whip stich : Check the links below :


Abbreviations used :  Using U.S Terminology

fsc : Foundation double crochet                        ch : Chain
dc : Double crochet                                                  sp(s) : Space(s)
st(s) : Stitch(es)                                                            hk : Hook
lp : Loop(s)                                                                    yo : Yarn Over
sk : Skip                                                                          sc : Single crochet
trc : Triple / treble crochet
fdc : Foundation double crochet
fpdc : Front post double crochet


Instructions : (Using U.S Terminology) 
We will start this pattern from the base of the top – so first you need to decide how long you want the top, and check out the measurements for that part of the body – so if you are taking this top all the way down to the waist, you will need to work half the round waist measure for your starting line – and if you are working it only till the mid-riff.. yup, you got it.. it’s the half mid-riff measure you will start with.
Also note that in patterns like this, you will need to take the largest body measure for your start count.  This means that if your chest measure is slightly more than the waist measure, that’s the measure (chest) you will use.

Please read through the entire pattern sheet before starting to see what you would like to make as there are many ideas given here, as usual. J

This is not my pattern – I found this chart and inspiration photograph – and these are my notes as I work on my pattern.


Part 1 : Front and Back


We will work two identical halves for this pattern – so one each for front and back. 

If you decide you want to make this into a crop top, then I’d suggest you make two rectangles – one each for the front and back.  The rectangle base will be half the waist/chest measure as indicated above, and the length (of the rectangle) will be however long you wish your crop top.
There is no decrease for armhole (no shaping).
Once done with your two rectangles, you will attach the shoulders and then the sides.  You will automatically get a small magyar sleeve of sorts.  Run a round of sc all around the neckline, armhole and base of the top (after you join the sides) and you will have a neat crop top ready.

May I suggest that if you are using this pattern to create a crop top, keep it a little loose, so that it will fashionably fall over the shoulder and look trendy ;)

If you want it to be a slightly longer top, you just continue with the pattern a little more, till you reach the level you wish for this top.  Easy enough, right?

Finally for my project, I’ve decided to start with fdc and I have also worked a small fpdc (front post double crochet) border. 
As it is a border, we will work it right at the end – so don’t worry why the fpdc has not shown up in Row 1.

That said you could start with a fdc row, and then work several rows of fpdc and then bpdc to start.  (When you work in rows, one row will be fpdc, and the following row must be in bpdc.  Check the top of this blog fora  "how to") 
If you are starting with the fpdc-bpdc rows, ensure that you keep notes and work the same number of rows for the 2nd side of your top too.

You could also decide to start the pattern right from the start base row, in which case you can start either with fsc or fdc – the choice of stitch does not matter, as long as you keep the stitch count and round measurements right.

Start : with fdc in multiples of 6 + 1 for half the round chest / bust / waist measure. Turn.   

Row 1 : dc in the 1st fdc ; ch 3, sk next fdc, sc in the next 3 fdc ;
*ch 5, sk next 3 fdc, sc in the next 3 fdc* ;
rep *to* till the last 2 fdc ; ch 3, sk next fdc, dc in the last fdc. Turn.

For this pattern, may I suggest that you work the sc into each stitch of the ch-sp and not around it, like we usually do.  This will just fix the stitch neatly in the centre of the ch-sp, which will make your top look great.  That said, for the pattern, it does not matter where you work your stitch – i.e into the chain or around it.

Row 2 : sc in the 1st dc ;
*ch 3, sk next sc, sc in the next sc ; ch 3, sk next sc, sc in the next ch-5 sp* ;
rep *to* till the last dc ; ch 3, sc in the last dc. Turn.

Row 3 : sc in the 1st sc ;
*ch 5, sk next sc, (sc in the next ch-5 sp ; sc in the next sc ; sc in the next ch-5 sp)* ; rep *to* till the last sc ; ch 5, sc in the last sc. Turn.

Row 4 : sc in the 1st sc ;
ch 3, sc in the next ch-5 sp ;
*ch 3, sk next sc, sc in the next sc ; ch 3, sk next sc, sc in the next ch-5 sp* ;
rep *to* till the last sc ; ch 3, sc in the last sc. Turn.

Row 5 : trc in the 1st sc ;
ch 3, (sc in the next ch-3 sp ; sc in the next sc ; sc in the next ch-3 sp) ;
*ch 5, sk next sc, rep (to) once* ;
rep *to* till the last sc ; ch 3, trc in the last sc

Row 6 : sc in the 1st trc ;
*ch 3, sk next sc, sc in the next sc ; ch 3, sk next sc, sc in the next ch-5 sp* ;
rep *to* till the last sc ; ch 5, sc in the last trc. Turn.

And that’s our one pattern repeat complete.
Rep Rows 3 to 6 till you reach the armhole or neckline level, whichever comes first , ending with either a Row 3 or 5.

Remember if you are working a crop top with the straight boat-like neckline, then you will work two rectangles without any decrease.


Part 2 : Armhole shaping
In case you want a slight armhole shaping, here’s what you need to do.

For the shaping of the armhole, you will first need to decide how deep you want this opening. 

Decrease Row : sl-st past the 1st ch-5 sp, next 3 sc and the next 3 ch (of the next ch-5 sp). 
You will now work the pattern as directed all the way till the 2nd last ch-5 sp from the other end ; till you reach the neckline level.


Part 3 : Square neckline shaping
At this point you will need to decide how deep you want your neckline.  Once you’ve got that figured, here’s what you need to do.

Count off from the centre to the side of the square and place a marker at the side 3-sc set.  Of course you need to decide how wide you want your neckline
1.       Once you have both the depth and width figured, count off and place two markers to mark the two sides of your neckline
2.     You will now work from one side of your armhole to this side marker and then back to the armhole.
3.     You will work all the way from armhole to neckline till you reach the shoulder
4.     Once you reach the shoulder, fasten off
5.     Re-attach your yarn at the 2nd marker for the other side of the neckline to shoulder portion and work all the way from neckline to armhole till you reach the second shoulder.  Fasten off.
You have successfully completed the front or one side of your top.

Work all these instructions for the back or other side of your top.
Remember that you may not want the same depth for the back of your neckline, so you will need to re-work the depth and width of your back neckline.
IF you decide to have a completely high neckline, then you will work from armhole to armhole, side to side all the way to the shoulder.


Part 4 : Sleeve idea
While I have not made a sleeve, you could.  So once you have joined the shoulders and sides, you have an armhole. 
You can work in a sleeve with both the rectangle finish as well as the shaped armhole finish.
If you are working in a sleeve, ensure that the armhole is slightly loose, so that there is a little *give* along the top of the sleeve – i.e when you attach on the sleeve, it should not hurt the wearer when they lift the arm… but then this is a general rule for all sleeve attachments.

The stitch count here will be in multiples of 6 and you will work in rounds.  You will run a round of sc all around ensuring you get the stitch count needed.

Round 1 : sc in the 1st sc ; ch 3, sk next sc, sc in the next 3 sc ;
*ch 5, sk next 3 sc, sc in the next 3 sc* ;
rep *to* till the last 2 sc ; ch 3, sk next sc, dc in the last sc.
Join with a sl-st to the 1st st.

Round 2 : sc in the 1st sc ;
*ch 3, sk next sc, sc in the next sc ; ch 3, sk next sc, sc in the next ch-5 sp* ;
rep *to* till the last dc ; ch 3, sc in the last sc.
Join with a sl-st to the 1st st.

Now follow the pattern using Rows 3 – 6, but working in rounds and joining at the end with a sl-st everytime.

Rep Rounds 3 to 6 till you reach the sleeve length you desire, ending with either a Row 3 or 5.

For the final finishing please check ideas in Part 5.


Part 5 : Finishing
Once you have completed both the front and the back pieces, you will join your two shoulder bits and then the sides to finish off the top.  I suggest that you run a round or two of sc all around the neckline as well as the armhole / end of sleeve for a neat finish.

Now if you decide you want that slight border along the base (and neckline / armhole), here’s what I have done.

Once I’d attached both front and back (along sides and shoulders), I worked 2-3 rounds of fpdc all around the bottom of the top.  As the sides are attached, it worked out neatly and I loved that there is not attachment that shows for the joining of the sides.  Work fpdc for as many rows as you think you need to get a flat base.  Once again, these rows do not really affect the pattern, so go ahead and create.

If you so decide, work the same fpdc around the neckline and armhole too.
Fasten off and weave in all ends.  Block as required per yarn instructions.

Enjoyed this ?? I sure did.. come back right here for more freebie patterns

If you're visiting me here for the first time, and have liked the experience, do add me to your mailing list (for your convenience) , and all my future free patterns will come straight to your mail box.  

I’d appreciate if you could credit my blog (and link the original pattern link) when you make your own creation.  Thanks.

Check out my awesome pins on Pinterest at https://in.pinterest.com/shyamanivas/ 



And please join me on my Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sweet-Nothings-Crochet/248919438644360  for more patterns.

Have a great day and see you soon. J

Here are some of my older creations.  Have fun with these free patterns too